The Roaches: Lud’s Church

This is the first in a series of posts I’ll be writing about how to get to and see parts of The Roaches and other Peak District places. I’ll also be making an effort to update parts of Wikipedia to reflect these changes too. Over time, paths change and the ways of getting to a lot of places change too. As I live in North Staffordshire I’m in a great location to be close to The Roaches and the Peak District and I’ll attempt to keep sites such as Wikipedia updated as well as my own collection of posts here.

To get to Lud’s Church requires a little walking up a few inclines. There is a car park around two miles from the location where you can park (located at 53.193063, -2.002955) for free. Walk out of that car park and turn right, following the narrow road. As you walk along the road, you’ll approach a fork, take the right side and walk down the hill to the Gradbach Mill Youth hostel. Once at the hostel, you’ll see the hostel on your right, a footbridge in front of you and a muddy path to the left. You need to follow the muddy path to the left which in turn curves to the left too. You will then come to a small gate, go through that gate and follow the path to the right.. Walk out of that car park and turn right, following the narrow road. As you walk along the road, you’ll approach a fork, take the right side and walk down the hill to the Gradbach Mill Youth Hostel. Once at the hostel, you’ll see the hostel on your right, a footbridge in front of you and a muddy path to the left. You need to follow the muddy path to the left which in turn curves to the left too. You will then come to a small gate, go through that gate and follow the path to the right.

Around 20m from there you will see a very, very narrow stile on your right (with a private grounds sign sitting on a gate further behind it). Go through that stile and turn left. Follow that road for around 30m. On the corner of the road, you’ll see another stile and if you look over the wall to the right you will see the footbridge that you need to cross.

Cross the footbridge and you will come to a sign post. Head straight up in hill, then follow the path that goes to the right. Stay along this path until you come to a large rock formation on your right (its a good ten minute walk). You will then see a sign for Lud’s Church to the left, follow it and within a few minutes you’ll arrive.

Geocaching.com Storing Plaintext Passwords

I completely found myself in shock earlier today when I had to use the ‘forgotten password’ feature on geocaching.com. To my complete amazement, they emailed my password back to me in plaintext. Now, bearing in mind that most of their site is basic in features I’m sure they haven’t generated their own two way encryption so that means they’re storing passwords plaintext which in this modern age is suicidal.

I simply couldn’t believe it, I hope they can prove me wrong but I’m almost sure they storing them plaintext. Please, someone from geocaching.com contact me and tell me you have some space age encryption going. Until then, I’m changing my password to something retarded.

Last.fm Auto-Tweeting

This has been moved to http://tweekly.fm as I’ve rewritten and redeveloped the tweekly system.

Also, there is a Facebook version here at laststat.us

I’ve just finished the beta of my autotweeting last.fm statistics system. It’ll take your last.fm top artists and publish them to Twitter on a day of your choosing.You can sign up for the beta here.

If you have any problems or encounter errors while using the system then please contact me as soon as you can do at [email protected].

Hacking a Fonera Router

A few people have asked about more details for the wireless bridge I’ve set up within my local network. You can find more information about it here. Its a pretty simple process and you end up with a router running DDWRT.

I’ve got it set up to bridge the ethernet port into the main wireless network here.

The Year of 1582

Calender

Switch your calendar to October 1582 and take a look – you’ll see something resembling the above image. There is a simple explanation for this though. In the year of 1582 the Pope decided that to correct the accumulation of time over the year they would remove the period of time from 5th October to 14th October to compensate.

Pope Gregory XIII, whom the modern calendar is named after (Gregorian), also established a system to prevent the accumulation from developing all over again. Every four years divisible by four would continue to be a leap year, but years divisible by 100 would not, unless they are also divisible by 400. The year 2000 was one of these special years that comes once every four centuries. 2000 is divisible by 100 but also divisible by 400 and therefore it is designated as a leap year.